Tree Council Jubilee Tree:
This is one of The Tree Council’s 60 educational tree planting schemes with children that were inspired by the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Each tree, provided by The Tree Council, was chosen and planted by volunteers in the community.
Type of tree:
Red Horse Chestnut
Location:
Duncton Village
Petworth
GU28 0LB

Duncton is a small village in West Sussex, with a population of fewer than 300 but a very strong sense of belonging.

After much discussion of tree varieties, it was decided that we would ask for a red horse chestnut (Aesculus x carnea ‘Briottii’) as our Diamond Jubilee tree.

This was because it would match the mature tree diagonally opposite the proposed planting site on the other side of the main road.

The chosen site is near the children’s playground and the village school, the idea being that the parish council would buy and maintain a circular seat around the tree so that mothers of children playing could sit and talk.

The tree was delivered in mid-April 2013 – a magnificent specimen a good 11 feet (3.2 metres) tall and already beginning to develop buds, so it needed planting quickly. It had to be transported to the village green tied vertically to the back of an old Land Rover, and made an impressive sight.

Pat Darley and Chris Davies, both parish council members, did the planting. We also added a wire mesh guard around the trunk – there are many rabbits in the area that just love young bark, as do the local deer.

Following the planting the weather was very dry, so the Tree Warden, Chris Davies, transported several rainbutt loads of water, again on the back of the Land Rover. More importantly, nearby residents carried many water buckets, especially during the very hot days.

Our village school, which is federated with Graffham School in the next parish, is a Forest School. This involves the children spending time each week throughout the year, regardless of weather, in the local woods, discovering the richness of the plants and animals that we are so lucky to have in the wild around this area.

JOIN THE TREE COUNCIL:

Become a Tree Warden

Whether your passion is about getting your hands dirty planting trees, working with your local community, or simply being the eyes, ears and voice for the trees down your street, then you may have what it takes to be a Tree Warden.

Tree Council Jubilee Tree:
This is one of The Tree Council’s 60 educational tree planting schemes with children that were inspired by the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Each tree, provided by The Tree Council, was chosen and planted by volunteers in the community.
Type of tree:
Wild Cherry
Location:
Newmillerdam Country Park
Wakefield
WF2 6QQ

Wakefield community groups came together to plant a wild cherry (Prunus avium ‘Plena’) Diamond Jubilee tree at the Arboretum in Newmillerdam Country Park in West Yorkshire.

Wakefield Wild Cherry

Roger Parkinson, Chairman of the Wakefield Tree Wardens Group, said: “We wanted to mark this very special year by illustrating how so many people are helping to improve our local area. Our Arboretum is just one improvement we are very proud of and this tree will be at the centre of this increasingly popular visitor attraction.”

Local schoolchildren were involved in the celebration when they were asked to enter an art competition illustrating how Her Majesty the Queen had planted many trees over the 60 years of her reign and why trees are important for people and wildlife.

Book prizes were awarded at Wakefield Methodist School and the pictures were put on display at community events during the autumn.

The research and time spent by the children on the artwork allowed them to find out more about the Jubilee and planting trees to commemorate important events.

The Diamond Jubilee cherry was one of the last trees to be planted after a five-year restoration project carried out by Wakefield Tree Wardens and Wakefield Council. It is now part of a wonderful collection in Newmillerdam Country Park, which attracts more than 300,000 visitors each year.

This Jubilee tree has its own entry in a Book of Dedication on public view in the Boat House, near the Arboretum. The book illustrates many of the trees in the collection, lists donors and sponsors and will be a lasting record of this valuable addition to the Wakefield district.

JOIN THE TREE COUNCIL:

Become a Tree Warden

Whether your passion is about getting your hands dirty planting trees, working with your local community, or simply being the eyes, ears and voice for the trees down your street, then you may have what it takes to be a Tree Warden.

Tree Council Jubilee Tree:
This is one of The Tree Council’s 60 educational tree planting schemes with children that were inspired by the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Each tree, provided by The Tree Council, was chosen and planted by volunteers in the community.
Type of tree:
Wild Cherry
Location:
Newmillerdam Country Park
Wakefield
WF2 6QQ

Wakefield community groups came together to plant a wild cherry (Prunus avium ‘Plena’) Diamond Jubilee tree at the Arboretum in Newmillerdam Country Park in West Yorkshire.

Wakefield Wild Cherry

Roger Parkinson, Chairman of the Wakefield Tree Wardens Group, said: “We wanted to mark this very special year by illustrating how so many people are helping to improve our local area. Our Arboretum is just one improvement we are very proud of and this tree will be at the centre of this increasingly popular visitor attraction.”

Local schoolchildren were involved in the celebration when they were asked to enter an art competition illustrating how Her Majesty the Queen had planted many trees over the 60 years of her reign and why trees are important for people and wildlife.

Book prizes were awarded at Wakefield Methodist School and the pictures were put on display at community events during the autumn.

The research and time spent by the children on the artwork allowed them to find out more about the Jubilee and planting trees to commemorate important events.

The Diamond Jubilee cherry was one of the last trees to be planted after a five-year restoration project carried out by Wakefield Tree Wardens and Wakefield Council. It is now part of a wonderful collection in Newmillerdam Country Park, which attracts more than 300,000 visitors each year.

This Jubilee tree has its own entry in a Book of Dedication on public view in the Boat House, near the Arboretum. The book illustrates many of the trees in the collection, lists donors and sponsors and will be a lasting record of this valuable addition to the Wakefield district.

JOIN THE TREE COUNCIL:

Become a Tree Warden

Whether your passion is about getting your hands dirty planting trees, working with your local community, or simply being the eyes, ears and voice for the trees down your street, then you may have what it takes to be a Tree Warden.